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AU-A7 illustration -High Resolution- by MrJumpManV4 AU-A7 illustration -High Resolution- by MrJumpManV4
The AU-A7 HARPIA was designed with the intention to be used as a support unit for armored squadrons and infantry units. Though the Harpia is relatively light on weaponry, its heavy armor, maneuverability, and stealth all make up for the absence of heavy weaponry. However light the weapons are relative to the Harpia’s weight, it is in no way lacking in firepower. On either side the Harpia there are two weapon stubs which can rotate vertically independent from the main body. A typical load-out on either stubs are a MATGM-12 and a dual 30mm auto-cannon, though more variants exist and are easily changed based on mission circumstances. All stub variants have 16 smoke grenades available as well as 8 grenade launcher hard-points.
At first look most would speculate the seemingly unbalanced appearance that the Harpia presents, though that is not the case as it can easily recover from high force impacts from almost any angle and it can traverse in almost any environment. With the revolutionary software from QZK called ALICE (Adaptive Locomotion and Improvised Calculated Execution) the Harpia is considered the first truly ‘self-aware’ articulating unit. ALICE can detect every joint’s torsion, angle, and vertical stress in addition to sensing ground surface tension and center mass and adapt to the sensory information accordingly. In order to navigate effectively ALICE is equipped with multiple LiDAR sensors on the forward and rear optics system capable of making a basic 3D image as it moves. In conjunction with linear and radial gyroscopes and ALICE the Harpia has been unsurpassed by any free standing articulation in the past and is likely to be the leading software for the next three generations of articulation units. The AU-A7 HARPIA has been colloquially named “the harpy”

(please forgive grammatical errors in the information below)

-Ejection-small high explosive charges eject the cap in the case of a major engine malfunction.

-Engine-Rear hatch enables engineers quick access for critical repairs
on the move, basic maintenance can even be achieved by the pilot in
any circumstance where engineers are not readily available.

Double turbine engine gives high torque output to the legs. Though the joints
are less responsive than most MMSR (micro molten sand reactor) designs the engine still offers a high TWR
(torque to weight ratio) giving it more speed and durability while retaining a respectable range.
redundancies prevent mechanical failure also making it as reliable as most MMSR designs.

RAOE (rapid atmospheric oxygen extraction) technology significantly increases efficiency by the extraction of
pure oxygen from the atmosphere for internal combustion during the compression phase. Spooling up the RAOE allows
for a instant/short lived injection of compressed pure oxygen for increased sprinting speed as well as temporary operation even
while the primary air intake is disabled.

The primary turbine engine offers a similar stealth ability in comparison to MMSR designs. at full output
the engine is no louder than a standard v-8 engine at 1000 RPM. The exhaust vents are also highly distributed and absorb 85% of all exhaust
heat. The ejected exhaust above the exhaust vents never reaches 5.5 Celsius above ambient temperature.

balance-Two DU (depleted uranium) rods shift the center of the mass relative to the 'dry-mass' (the mass that the
vehicle would otherwise have without the rods) of the vehicle using activated magnets. advanced computers manipulate the joints
and in conjunction with the DU rods allows for an environmentally adaptive stance even after
receiving heavy damage. overall there are 3 balancing rods/ring implemented for yaw torque, forward-back and for side-side motion.
Most of the force associated with balancing from the rods (and yaw ring) comes from the extremely quick reaction time, if necessary the
rods can push the center of mass 3 meters forwards of the center dry-mass for aprox. .23 seconds.
unfortunately the proportion of the DU rod's weight is significantly lower than that of the rest of the vehicle so a center of mass
shift can only change by about 35cm after the main rod is fully displaced.


Stubs-two stubs on either side of the vehicle allow for various actions, especially offensive and defensive capability.
Both of the stubs always have the weight distributed so as to not interfere with the balance of the vehicle.

feet-the LIT feet (low impact tred) allow for very low probability of IED impact

software-ALICE (adaptive locomotion and improvised calculated execution)
Unlike many conventional AU (articulating units) the A7 is extremely stable
even in conjunction with the LIT feet. If it were not for its high center mass it
would in face be more stable than most wheeled vehicles. some of the many ways it
achieves this stability is by counter stepping, adaptive self awareness software
and miniature hind legs that branch of from the 3(9)D (lowest) leg segments.

Optics-the triple optics configuration grants excellent depth perception and field of view. Central to the triple optics is a DCL (data collection LASER)
which can measure and detect material, barometric pressure, range, depth (to a certain precision), temperature and various other useful parameters. In the unlikely case
of receiving debilitating damage to the optics protective lids slide over and a small back door is open for the pilot to replace a new optics system. for extra situational
awareness a rear view camera is also available.

undeployed-while undeployed the A7 is extremely small and designed to fit in common airdrop vehicles
for parachuting such the C-130.

range of motion (from undeployed leg positions)-
body core serv. ^ leg 3(9) +15° -15°
leg 3(9)A serv. ^ leg 3(9)B +4° -93°
leg 3(9)B serv. ^ leg 3(9)C +43° -4°
leg 3(9)C serv. ^ leg 3(9)D +0° -173°
leg 3(9)D serv. ^ LIT 3(9) +10° -22°

Stance dimensions-
width: 5.4
length: 5.3
height: 6.2m

Leg max phys.: 6.3m
leg min phys.: 2.2m
leg standard length: 4.1
leg component length sum: 13.1m
leg 3(9)A: 2.9m
leg 3(9)B: 2.2m
leg 3(9)C: 2.9m
leg 3(9)D: 3.4m
LIT 3(9): 1.7m
body core height: 2.6m

weight:

Total-
12,950lb
body core-
4250lb

stubs (2x)-
1700lb

legs-
6400lb

engine-
600lb

offensive/defensive measures

-2x medium weapon bays, variants include: a MATGM-12,
a dual 30mm auto-cannon, a non-lethal water cannon.
all weapons bays have 16 IR smoke grenades and are
of equal weight and center of mass.

-8x dual grenade launcher hard-points (total of 16 grenades)

-32% reactive armor surface coverage (mostly critical areas)
Add a Comment:
 
:iconneurovore:
Neurovore Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2013
Very interesting shape. I am curious though, how come you decided to give it a bi-pedal chassis instead of a wheeled design like a tank? Would it not make sense to offset the relatively high center of gravity by spreading more mass outward?
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
i was thinking about adding some wheels or tracks to the mid leg section, never got around to it though.
Reply
:iconlonesoldier54:
lonesoldier54 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013
To brow a line from Tony Stark, 'I want ONE!!'. Get work, great ideas and details man.
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
thanks very much!
Reply
:iconspyderrock48:
spyderrock48 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013
Did you ever play chromehounds? If not I would highly recommend it if you get the chance.
Reply
:iconreactor-axe-man:
Reactor-Axe-Man Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The real problem with tiny feet is ground pressure. You would not be able to take this thing into places where it should theoretically outperform tanks, which is a dense urban environment. Those stiletto heels would punch right through pavement, and crack concrete and your ability to mount elevated parking garages, set up on roof tops and such would be diminished.
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
i doubt it would have trouble on pavement, perhaps on sand or deep mud but most other surfaces not so much.
Reply
:iconaxonn5:
Axonn5 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013
Hell nicely done man! I love ure artwork. And I gotta say, this AU-A7 kinda, just barely kinda looks like in a way the US team's Mech off from Battlefield 2142. But in anycase, love the back part of the AU-A7. Keep up thee paste. :D
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
thank!
indeed it was inspired by the L5 Riesig, I didn't really reference the image while i was working but the overall shape is what i based it off of.
Reply
:iconaxonn5:
Axonn5 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2013
Np man. :D

I know what u mean, and I know that u wouldn't. ;) Like me, I just draw art like without looking at something like fully bcuz I want it 2b in my mind of what the pic would look like. But yea I getcha.
Reply
:iconbaron-engel:
Baron-Engel Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Question do you have an idea of what its ground pressure to ground surface? I'm just curious how its 12,950lb weight is spread out when walking soft ground like mud.
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
refer to the comment conversation i had with Alighierian below.
Reply
:iconalighierian:
Alighierian Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2013  Student Photographer
And this is why I started watching you in the first place :]
another utterly awesome looking mech with great attention to detail
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Doooooooh *blushes*
Reply
:iconstealthdesigns:
Stealthdesigns Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2013
Hay awesome, but I think spyderrock might be right about the feet, they do look unstable.
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
With any other 'stupid' software without inertial compensation, i.e. counter stepping, I would be inclined to agree. ALICE (advanced real time software) however is intended to allow for the significant amount of stability. It's intended to use more of a dynamic equilibrium approach for stability instead of a natural free stand structure that you see on most other mechs (though with the hind legs it does have good structural stability while staying still). You can reference the second paragraph of the description to see more detail about ALICE and stability if you're interested.
Reply
:iconstealthdesigns:
Stealthdesigns Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013
Ahh ok. Nice work by the way, real nice!
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
thank you sir
Reply
:iconspyderrock48:
spyderrock48 Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2013
All your mechs always look like recoil would make them tip over. This one isn't as bad with the little sticks you call hind legs :D haha
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
thanks, i'm glad you didn't mention the tiny feet Xp

the idea is that it wouldn't tip over because of its ability to counter step when impacted by some strong force.
Reply
:iconspyderrock48:
spyderrock48 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013
What I meant by recoil will tip them over, is that it has tiny feet.
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
yes it has tiny feet.

and yes recoil would tip it over, hence the counter step action provided by the software.
Reply
:iconspyderrock48:
spyderrock48 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013
But you could just rule out that necessity :(
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
but bigger feet = higher IED impact rate, besides i prefer these aesthetically anyways.
Reply
:iconspyderrock48:
spyderrock48 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013
IED impact rate? A lot of times IED's are magnetic in nature, or remote detonated, with remote being the most common. Your feet could be the size of a pencil, and you'd still get hit by IEDs. 
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
shhh, no one needs to know that.
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconspyderrock48:
spyderrock48 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013
4.bp.blogspot.com/_9iMIweN5ntc…

Look at the feet on that. Sure it isn't the best model, it's from an older Mech Warrior game, but the feet look broad and stable, yours look like peg legs. 
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
the feet were intentionally small for aesthetic, and i'd like to think for functional purposes, whether or not others disagree concerns me to a degree but mostly it's beauty in the eye of the beholder, and functionally there's no sound way to disprove its functionality in my opinion. I'd much rather discontinue this discussion, practically every comment has been about the feet at this point.
Reply
:iconspyderrock48:
spyderrock48 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013
for the most part I only say your mechs have small feet to annoy you :P 
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
mission accomplished sergeant nuisance
Reply
:iconspyderrock48:
spyderrock48 Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2013
That's Lieutenant Nuisance to you.
Reply
:iconalighierian:
Alighierian Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2013  Student Photographer
Which is in theory a sound idea, but it also requires having stable feet which can take a lot more than just the weight of the mech itself.
The main stud is ok, in the sense that it's a half circle at the bottom (more flexible walking, greater ease of walking up / down slopes, but it might get stuck in soft terrain faster due to the small surface area).
On first glance the small support studs really look like wooden peg legs and quite flimsy.  However, on closer inspection it appears the lower part can go horizontal to have a greater surface area when trying not to fall after an especially hard impact, correct?
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The feet aren't significantly different than most AU feet in terms of ankle stress, considering the harpy's ankles are a bit more simple than most it actually allows for a larger/stronger connection to the leg through the ankle. you may be able to see a fairly large suspension thing on the ankle, though i'm not sure if it's visible. You're correct in assuming it would be unable to traverse effectively in soft terrain like sand or deep mud, though i would like to point out that ALICE has "ground surface tension" awareness allowing it to compensate fairly well for its lack of tred surface area, i.e. it can maintain a fair amount of stability on slippery surfaces. If you're not already aware of the Big Dog i would look it up on youtube (bigdog robot demonstration should yield a video result), this robot works in many similar ways but, as it is the future, it is much more advanced allowing for compensation to these factors while being bipedal unlike the quadrupedal big dog (which also has tiny feet). The "peg legs" are relatively flimsy in comparison to the primary legs, they're intended more for a backup system to 'catch' the harpy if it tips backwards (your description of its purpose seems accurate). The hind legs can only lift about 15% of the overall weight and they do so when stationary to add 4 ground contact points instead of the naturally unstable 2 ground contact points. while moving the peg legs are for the most part useless.

In summary, i am aware that there are short-comings to the LIT feet's low surface area, but i believe they far out-way the disadvantages since ALICE grants significant stability. I've considered making a variant with "snow shoes" for sand and mud, or perhaps 4 deployable gears that increase surface area on either leg. I've put a fair amount of consideration aesthetically and functionally into the feet, perhaps more than any other system in the harpy and I'm not surprised people question its feasibility.
Reply
:iconalighierian:
Alighierian Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Student Photographer
addition to my previous comment: obviously that hind leg system will only work if it's not on the ground at the time of the impact
Reply
:iconmrjumpmanv4:
MrJumpManV4 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Your previous comment had a lot of good ideas, i'm going to leave it in my inbox to modify the harpy a bit.
for the hind leg, although your stepping hind leg idea is good, i doubt it's strong enough to counter such a fatal blow where the primary leg can just counter step.
any force strong enough to overpower the counter step would likely destroy it anyways (unless said force is a SUPER strong wind)

This is a quick pose which i hope explains the counter-step action adequately.
Note that it's completely over-exaggerating any force that it would be likely to encounter.

a thought that you just gave me is if something were to run into its feet to try and knock it off balance, so i'm thinking some kind of quick 'crouching' maneuver to lower the center mass and avoid being tripped.
Reply
:iconalighierian:
Alighierian Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Student Photographer
well, since the hind leg is mainly just idling stance support, maybe it's an idea to have a kit (perhaps optional field kit, to be installed if the pilot prefers to have it?) which would replace the hind leg in a sense: img801.imageshack.us/img801/38…

those red beams are the support beams, which could along the grey track so that the shock absorber can be retracted and deployed (with freedom on which angle needed depending on the terrain)

in a nutshell:
heavy duty shock absorber field modification kit
- reduced mobility due to extra weight on legs
- increased recovery speed in case of knock down

when the mech is hit by a strong force in the top section of the mech, ALICE might have problems counter-stepping in rough terrain like ruined city / mountainous terrain filled with boulders etc / poor terrain like heavy mud. a method ALICE could then employ would be to crouch (to lower the centre of gravity, like you mentioned) and land on the shock absorbers. due to not fully going down but effectively ending up in a crouching position, you'd be able to get back up right away. this system could also work nicely together with the shoes I mentioned in my other reply.
could be better to have this for those situations than ruin a hind leg every time, right?
Reply
:iconalighierian:
Alighierian Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2013  Student Photographer
yea, I've seen the Big Dog, basically a donkey-sized 4-legged and very noisy back-back hauling robot with very good stability
and the concept I was talking about, I slightly explained with this image (I hope): img11.imageshack.us/img11/4853…
in a nutshell: as a last resort in case of a sudden heavy impact which cannot be compensated in time by stepping back with one leg, one peg will go horizontal to slightly catch the mech before it totally fully falls. no matter how fast you can get back up, falling down in combat is a bad idea (and replacing a hind leg is a 'bit' cheaper than patching up some holes in the mech caused by heavy weapons).
the degree of which it goes horizontal can vary, obviously, depending on what gives the best results with the least structural damage.
I guess it's kind-of comparable to breaking your fall with your hand if you suddenly tip over backwards. fat chance something goes wrong unless you place your hand perfectly, and avoid placing weight on that hand.

and as for 'snow shoes', perhaps a system comprised of the shoe itself, a single connection point (one on each side of the foot, on the same axle so it can pivot) and an actuator so you can control the angle of the shoe. the hind legs could be retracted during normal walking since they're not needed
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